Stop Complaining- It’s Killing Your Peace And Happiness

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Most of us have that one friend who is constantly complaining about the weather, the traffic, the government or almost anything around us.

It may seem absolutely normal to complain and be negative, yet, it is important to understand that the constant whining and bickering can affect our physical and mental wellbeing.

Constant venting may render you a chronic complainer and will lead to spewing negativity in your life affecting you and your friends and family.

According to a report, “When we complain, our brain releases stress hormones that harm neural connections in areas used for problem-solving and other cognitive functions. This also happens when we listen to someone else moan and groan.”

“Complaining or cribbing about a common topic is often a conversation starter between two strangers,” says Jyoti Rana, an MBA student.

“They tend to enjoy pointing out at the flaws without looking at the other side of the story.

They might find is amusing about how they ‘connect’ so well despite it being an absolute mood killer for those around them. Staying in a hostel I have realised that you are affected by your roommate’s ideology or their current mood.

I know there are too many problems around us to not talk about them, but, if all we are doing about it is talking, then why spread the negativity? ” she adds.

“Those who complain constantly about their own body may be really ill…

On the other hand, staying around people who complain about the environment around them can be stressful but it is finally how one adapts to an environment. This is the true sign of intelligence,” says Dr Bajpayee.

“Moreover, if one is anxious he often constantly complains. Chronic stress may be a big contributor to the stress response with all hormonal changes etc. Also one cannot choose life the way one wants it. Don’t stay away, instead try to dissipate stress with known methods,” adds Dr Manish Bajpayee, leading City Psychiatrist.

“Negativity is like a disease – once it starts it is hard to stop,” says Manisha Jain, Leading Image Consultant and Founder Director at Seachanges who shares some of her trusted ways to stay positive in life.

“Negative situations happen all the time, we can’t avoid them however we can counteract the negative effect on our lives and attitudes. I suggest whenever you get a negative thought, nip it in the bud itself. Don’t allow the negativity to dwell within you as negative thoughts are just thoughts, not facts.

We should take extra effort to learn the power of positive thinking for a healthy life. Not only is negativity unproductive, but, it can be emotionally draining as well.

“The first and foremost step is to practise gratitude. Talk about the things you are grateful for with your near and dear ones.

Keep a gratitude journal to capture the thankfulness you feel for what you have on a daily basis. Doing so will help you have a grateful mind and heart even when bad things happen.

Exercise is an excellent way to fight the negative effects of bad situations. Indulging in yoga or meditation will keep your mind and body in better shape thereby improving your mental and physical health. It will also boost self-esteem and reduce the negativity within us.

Change your vocabulary and Try avoiding words like “never “and “cannot”. Instead, say that you have struggled with it in the past, but will do what you can to change that.

Do things that make you happy. If you are not happy then you will naturally think negatively. Instead, spare time to cultivate your hobbies. Doing so will help you to reduce your negative energy.

Finally, remember nothing good can come out of being negative, so why waste energy on it,” Manisha adds.

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Loveleen Kaur

Loveleen Kaur

She loves travelling, dogs, sarcasm, humour and anything that spells F O O D, in that order. A writer on a journey to make positive stories a morning ritual and give society what it needs the most - optimism !!

Reach her at loveleen@pune365.com or tweet @KaurKaur18
Loveleen Kaur

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