#MoodMeter: Smoking Kills. Quit Before It’s Too Late

SMOKING KILLS - Kick the habit now ! Issued In Public Interest

What starts as a fad and the quintessential ‘just for the heck of it ‘ eventually moves on to becoming a peer pressure led habit…

Unfortunately, the unwelcome habit of smoking seems to be here to stay, slowly but surely killing millions who fall prey. Despite the graphic warnings on cigarette packs, counselling and availability of smoking cessation products, smoking continues and unabated. Trying to quit smoking isn’t going to be easy for everyone, but it is not impossible. There are many ways that you can go around it, like using nicotine patches, nicotine gum, taking up vaping or even trying natural supplements. You may see many people vaping and you may be interested, but don’t know where to start. This is nothing to worry about. By looking into the 2019 guide on how to vape, you’ll get the hang of this in no time. You’ll soon be able to find a solution to this bad habit, using e-cigarettes and vaping could be a good way to go, some stating the best e juice and vaping could replace your reliance on nicotine. And if this doesn’t make you want to quit, maybe knowing that as a smoker, your insurance policies will be reasonably higher than someone who has recently decided to give it up. If you didn’t know this already, why not find out more by checking out a site like https://www.moneyexpert.com/life-insurance/. Maybe you’ll soon change your mind and decide smoking isn’t worth it after all.

Maharashtra is among the top states on the smoking chart.

According to a report, one in every three adult men in Maharashtra uses tobacco while one in every six adult women uses tobacco.

Almost 1% of adult women over 15 years of age have taken up smoking between 2009 and 2017. This counts to almost 8 lakh women smokers.

Tobacco kills 10 lakh Indians every year. Almost 40% of these cancers are linked to tobacco use. India has 11·2 per cent of the world’s total smokers.

We spoke to a cross section of Pune’s youth to find out why they smoke and what their excuse is for not quitting the habit?

Reema Sen, Media Student: Curiosity got the better of me and the urge to continue with never faded. It all started in high school when I shifted to Rajasthan. The hostel as everyone knows, is a place where all the ‘stuff’ happens.

It started from smoking cigarettes and ended at trying the ‘beedi’ and even ‘weed’ (marijuana).

When I came to Pune for my masters degree, it got worse. I met people who already were experts in rolling weed and ‘scoring’ (procuring) it too.

I quit alcohol and found my kick in smoking. Ever since, there has been no looking back!

Jawed Khan, Marketing Head: I don’t drink, but ‘sheesha’ is my ultimate drug. I felt ‘ left out of the gang’ when I was the only one holding a glass of sprite while everyone in the party binged on alcohol. After a silly quest, I was introduced to this act of intoxicating oneself to death. Not that I liked it, yet, I had to make it a part of my lifestyle to be one of the ‘cool’ types. That was stupid I know and I have realised it too.

Although am trying to quit smoking, let me tell you, it is not that easy. A drag or two is what I still crave for.

Pratishtha Awasthi, English Honours Student: Smoking? I will never do that! Yes, this is what I used to tell everyone when I shifted to Pune from Kolhapur. But the cloud of smoke took me on like a wild fire. I lived with my elder sister who was honest with me about her drinking and smoking habit. This never mattered to me much though, I was concerned about her.

At my birthday party when she offered me a drag, I was courteous enough to try it. The ‘trip’ was quite something. The nice calming music and the psychedelic experience that I had that day got me all out. I know it is harmful but it is not like I haven’t tried quitting.

I am vulnerable when I don’t ‘roll’ one.

Lavina Bhattacharya, Company Secretary: The little devil came to me as a suggestive gesture from my office mates when they found me all stressed.

To them it was medication. I would see them taking ‘chai and sutta’ breaks and soon I was also a part of the ‘sutta clan’. It really helped as a stressbuster and later was an obsession. It didn’t make much difference later, but I knew I was addicted. I came back to my hometown Pune, with the thought that it would help me quit smoking and lead a healthier life.

But even today, I sometimes smoke up at the ‘tappri’ near my office without my parents knowing.

Feroz Irani, Entrepreneur: Yes, to quit smoking ‘maal’ was the toughest thing I could do. For I puffed out at least 7-8 rolls of marijuana a day. It even came to the point where a friend of mine would give me some marijuana that he had purchased at a dispensary, to help get me through some tough times. I should have asked for help, but it was my go-to thing in happiness and sadness. The high was of all sorts.

It made me see into the world differently and made me creative too. I could write poetry after three ‘joints’. It might sound weird to some, but nothing makes you so vulnerable and metaphysical. I was at my worst when I couldn’t get one. I was put on medication and under close scrutiny by my parents.

I have seen them being in a complex state of mind seeing me behave so inhumanly, but the only thing I wanted was my dose of drugs. Thankfully, two years, and I am finally out of it. It might be fun for some, but seeing your family die everyday because of you is more painful.

Quit before you regret. Not everyone gets a second chance.

~~

SMOKING KILLS ! Pune365 strongly discourages the use of tobacco and the consumption of alcohol.

#All views expressed are of the individual respondents (names changed to protect privacy) and Pune365 does not necessarily subscribe to them.

Loveleen Kaur

Loveleen Kaur

She loves travelling, dogs, sarcasm, humour and anything that spells F O O D, in that order. A writer on a journey to make positive stories a morning ritual and give society what it needs the most - optimism !!

Reach her at loveleen@pune365.com or tweet @KaurKaur18
Loveleen Kaur

Comments

comments