Are Menstrual Cups safe?

Here are questions from readers that were addressed by leading obstetrician and gynaecologist Dr Mini Salunkhe. The identities of the solution-seekers have been withheld to protect their privacy.

Dr, can you please advise me on how to use a menstrual cup? Is it a safe, hygienic and an easier process as compared to using pads or tampons?

So here is how you use your menstrual cup. Wash your hands well, fold and hold the cup and then insert it into your vagina tilting it back to the base of your spine. Then place it over your cervical region.

This cup can be sued upto a maximum duration of 12 hours spot after which it must be removed, emptied. cleaned and then re-inserted. This way it is safe and hygienic to use.

The process is as simple as using a tampon and a pad.

I am not a sexually active person, does that make a difference if I want to starting using tampons?

Tampons, like pads are products designed to absorb your menstrual flow Even if you aren’t sexually active there is no need to worry since it won’t injure your hymen.

In fact, women use tampons for greater physical freedom during their periods. I would recommend changing the tampons ideally every 4-6 hours using the most absorbent types to manage the menstrual flow. This will help you remain as healthy and comfortable during your periods.

My father feels awkward buying sanitary napkins for me and my mother when he goes to the supermarket. How can I make him understand this is a normal biological process and there is nothing to be embarrassed about.

Hmmm I understand but frankly this isn’t a question that I can answer! You must address this to our resident counsellor Dr. Know who may have a strategy for you 🙂

Maybe you should take your father along the next time when you are buying pads. This will probably make him feel more comfortable about getting it next time!

All the best to you with this.

Apart from oral pills, what other safe alternatives are there as contraceptives from a woman’s perspective?

Well, there are several options you may opt for apart from the oral contraceptive pills. There are many hormonal and non-hormonal contraceptive options available. If you have borne a child, a good option would be to go for an intra-uterine device. If not spermicidal jellies, vaginal rings, contraceptive injections and non-hormonal (twice a week ) tablets are all available.

Selecting a worry-free method of contraception that also suits you well is best discussed in detail with your gynaecologist.

Thank you, readers for your queries. I hope I have been able to answer them and clarify your doubts. I would be more than happy to take time off to answer all your questions week after week. You can reach me via editorial@pune365.com

Mini_Salunke_JPGDr Mini Salunkhe is a senior gynaecologist practising in Pune for over a decade. Apart from being a private practitioner, she is a consulting obstetrician and gynaecologist at Inamdar Hospital

 

 

Dr Mini Salunkhe

Dr Mini Salunkhe

Dr Mini Salunkhe is a senior gynaecologist practising in Pune for over a decade. Apart from being a private practitioner, she is a consulting obstetrician and gynaecologist at Inamdar Hospital. Dr Salunkhe addresses reader queries every Friday on Pune365.
Dr Mini Salunkhe

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